Contractor's Index to the 1997 Uniform Building Code, Loose-Leaf

Be the first to review this product

$20.00

This common-sense index helps you quickly and easily find the section you're looking for in the UBC. It lists topics under the names builders actually use in construction. Best of all, it gives the full section number and the actual page in the UBC where you'll find it.



Written by a former builder and building inspector who knows the UBC from both perspectives.

Weight 0.8800
ISBN 1-57218-068-4
Page Count 192
Author Jack M. Hageman
Publisher Craftsman Book Company
Dimensions 8-1/2 x 11

Finally, there's a common-sense index that helps you quickly and easily find the section you're looking for in the UBC. It lists topics under the names builders actually use in construction. Best of all, it gives the full section number and the actual page in the UBC where you'll find it.

If you need to know the requirements for windows in exit access corridor walls, just look under Windows. You'll find the requirements you need are in Section 1004.3.4.3.2.2 in the UBC – on page 115.

This practical index was written by a former builder and building inspector who knows the UBC from both perspectives. If you hate to spend valuable time hunting through pages of fine print for the information you need, this is the book for you.

Write Your Own Review

You're reviewing: Contractor's Index to the 1997 Uniform Building Code, Loose-Leaf

Introduction

This index makes it easy to find what you're looking for in the 1997 Uniform Building Code, Volume 1.

While the Code has its own index - and this may be adequate for the building inspector whose profession is knowing the Code - it often proves frustrating for the average contractor who simply needs to know the Code requirements for the particular part of the job he's working on. If you're a building inspector, you probably know under what main heading a particular item is listed in the Code. If you're a contractor, you'll probably just look under the name of the item. If that's not how it's listed, you can waste valuable time hunting for it, or - and this happens far too often - take your best guess and hope the inspector thinks it's OK.

Entries in this index are by the terms builders usually use, not the ones architects or lawyers may be comfortable with, though these "official" terms are also included. It's also ten times more detailed than the index in the UBC, going into practically every subcategory. Where there are multiple terms for the same item, such as drywall, sheetrock, or wallboard, they're cross-referenced.

In addition, this index tells you on what page of the '97 UBC an item is covered.

To use it, simply look up the subject you need, then turn to the page of the UBC listed in the right-hand column. If you don't immediately see the material you want, refer to the center column in this index to find the Section number. Once you're on the right page, it's easy to find the information.

For more information about what the UBC requires, order Contractor's Guide to the Building Code, by this author. It explains Code requirements in contractors' language. There's an order form in the back of this book.

cbc_logo.gif (654 bytes) Contractor's Index to the 1997
Uniform Building Code, Vol. 1

by Jack M. Hageman

Contractor's Index to the 1997 Uniform Building Code is a common-sense index that helps you quickly and easily find the section you're looking for in the UBC. It lists topics under all the names builders actually use in construction. In fact, it's more than ten times longer than the index in the Code itself. Best of all, it gives you the full section number and the actual page in the UBC that you'll find it on.

If, for example, you need to find the requirements for windows in exit access corridor walls, you might think to look under Windows in the UBC index. It's not there. You might try Openings, which tells you to look under Penetrations. But it's not there either. You might give up at this point. But with this book, just look under Windows. You'll find the requirements you need are in Section 1004.3.4.3.2.2 in the UBC. What's more, it tells you it's on page 115.

A building inspector who makes his living finding code sections may know what to look up, and also, once he knows it's Section 1004.3.4.3.2.2, where to find it in the Code. The author of this book believes that turning to page 115 is a whole lot easier. If both you and the building inspector are looking for a particular Code requirement, chances are you'll "outdraw" the inspector every time if you have this book.

This is a practical index written by a former builder and building inspector, author of the popular Contractor's Guide to the Building Code. If you're often frustrated by not being able to locate what you need in the Code, or if you hate to spend valuable time hunting through pages and pages of fine print that are organized in a way only a building inspector is comfortable with, this is the book for you.

Jack Hageman has been on both sides of the inspector's counter - as a builder waving his hammer at the inspector, and as the inspector, waving his code book at the builder. He served for a decade as building inspector for the City of Kennewick, in Washington, and has taught the building code to contractors and inspectors at several universities. He knows how hard it is to find and follow every detail required in a constantly-changing building code, and how expensive an error or oversight can be. With this index, he makes it easy for the builder to find what he needs in the code, and maybe the inspector too.